iRedMail Configuration Tips and Time-Savers

i

By all accounts setting-up your own mail server can be a complex task and one I’ve always shied away from until recently when I thought I’d give iRedMail a go. Thanks to this open-source mail server solution I now have my own fully-functioning, well-configured mail server handling mail for numerous mail accounts on several domains.

Getting to this stage wasn’t easy, but not the nightmare it is often portrayed as. I relied heavily on these excellent guides to get the mail server up-and-running: How to Easily Set Up a Full-Featured Mail Server on Ubuntu 18.04 with iRedMail and How to Host Multiple Mail Domains in iRedMail with Nginx and then the official iRedMail documentation to fine tune the components.

During testing I re-provisioned the mail server many, many, many times and developed my own way of doing things, some of which may be useful to others.

Please note that the following were tested using iRedMail version 0.9.9.

 

 

1. Create New Mail Domains from the Command Line

During installation iRedMail configures a single mail domain. Additional mail domains can be added using iRedAdmin – the iRedMail web admin panel. During testing a more efficient, consistent and convenient way for me to create new mail domains was from the MySQL command-line client.

To invoke the MySQL client as root:

Dummy Content
sudo mysql -u root

 

 

To create the new mail domain:

Dummy Content
SET @DOMAIN:='domain.com';

 

 

Dummy Content
INSERT INTO `vmail`.`domain` (`domain`, `transport`, `settings`, `created`, `active`) VALUES (@DOMAIN, 'dovecot', 'default_user_quota:512;', NOW(), '1');

 

 

To display the newly created mail domain record:

Dummy Content
SELECT `domain`, `transport`, `settings`, `created`, `active` FROM `vmail`.`domain` WHERE `domain`=@DOMAIN;

 

 

 

 

2. Create New Mail Accounts from the Command Line

iRedMail ships with a script – create_mail_user_SQL.sh – to create mail accounts from the command line. The script requires two parameters – email address and password:

Dummy Content
ADDRESS='steve@example.com'; \
PASSWORD='pAss71woRd'; \
cd ${HOME}/iRedMail-0.9.9/tools; \
bash create_mail_user_SQL.sh $ADDRESS $PASSWORD > user.sql; \
sudo mysql -u root -p -D vmail -e "SOURCE user.sql"; \
rm -f user.sql

 

 

The script does not allow the user’s quota to be set on an individual basis without amending the hard-coded value in the script file each time nor does it capitalise the first letter of the user’s name – steve instead of Steve – which is derived from the user’s email address.

Using sed the original script can be amended so that it accepts the user’s quota as a third parameter and automatically capitalises the user’s first name. The differences between the original and amended script are detailed here:

Dummy Content
sed -i.bak -e "s/^DEFAULT_QUOTA='1024'/DEFAULT_QUOTA=\$3/" -e "s/X'2'/X'3'/" -e "s/ltd plain_password/ltd plain_password mail_quota/" -e "s/'\${username}'/\"\$(echo \${username} | awk '{print toupper(substr(\$0,0,1))tolower(substr(\$0,2))}')\"/" $HOME/iRedMail-0.9.9/tools/create_mail_user_SQL.sh

 

 

The script can now be run with with a value for the user’s quota. Note that a value of 0 means there is no restriction on the size of the mailbox:

Dummy Content
ADDRESS='steve@example.com'; \
PASSWORD='pAss71woRd'; \
QUOTA='0'; \
cd ${HOME}/iRedMail-0.9.9/tools; \
bash create_mail_user_SQL.sh $ADDRESS $PASSWORD $QUOTA > user.sql; \
sudo mysql -u root -p -D vmail -e "SOURCE user.sql"; \
rm -f user.sql

 

 

 

 

3. SOGo and Memcached

If you opted to have SOGo installed by the iRedMail installer you may see a lot of errors afterward containing SERVER HAS FAILED AND IS DISABLED UNTIL TIMED RETRY in /var/log/sogo/sogo.log and when the script /var/vmail/backup/backup_sogo.sh is executed (usually as a daily cronjob). This is due to Memcached either not being installed or the Memcached server not running.

On Ubuntu, to check if Memcached is installed:

Dummy Content
dpkg -L memcached
dpkg-query: package 'memcached' is not installed
Use dpkg --info (= dpkg-deb --info) to examine archive files,
and dpkg --contents (= dpkg-deb --contents) to list their contents.
/.
/etc
/etc/default
/etc/default/memcached
/etc/init.d
/etc/init.d/memcached
/lib
/lib/systemd
/lib/systemd/system
/lib/systemd/system/memcached.service
/usr
/usr/bin
/usr/bin/memcached
/usr/include
/usr/include/memcached
/usr/include/memcached/protocol_binary.h
/usr/lib
/usr/lib/tmpfiles.d
/usr/lib/tmpfiles.d/memcached.conf
/usr/share
/usr/share/doc
/usr/share/doc/memcached
/usr/share/doc/memcached/NEWS.Debian.gz
/usr/share/doc/memcached/NEWS.gz
/usr/share/doc/memcached/README.Debian
/usr/share/doc/memcached/README.md
/usr/share/doc/memcached/changelog.Debian.gz
/usr/share/doc/memcached/copyright
/usr/share/doc/memcached/protocol.txt.gz
/usr/share/man
/usr/share/man/man1
/usr/share/man/man1/memcached.1.gz
/usr/share/memcached
/usr/share/memcached/memcached.conf.default
/usr/share/memcached/scripts
/usr/share/memcached/scripts/README.damemtop
/usr/share/memcached/scripts/damemtop
/usr/share/memcached/scripts/damemtop.yaml
/usr/share/memcached/scripts/memcached-tool
/usr/share/memcached/scripts/start-memcached
/usr/share/memcached/scripts/systemd-memcached-wrapper

 

 

To install Memcached:

Dummy Content
sudo apt-get install -y memcached

 

 

After installing Memcached you’d be forgiven for thinking the Memcached server has started and is running without issue. To check the status of Memcached:

Dummy Content
sudo systemctl status memcached
 memcached.service - memcached daemon
   Loaded: loaded (/lib/systemd/system/memcached.service; enabled; vendor preset: enabled)
   Active: active (running) since Sun 2019-12-29 07:32:50 GMT; 2s ago
     Docs: man:memcached(1)
 Main PID: 19952 (memcached)
    Tasks: 10 (limit: 4583)
   CGroup: /system.slice/memcached.service
           └─19952 /usr/bin/memcached -u memcache -l 127.0.0.1
 memcached.service - memcached daemon
   Loaded: loaded (/lib/systemd/system/memcached.service; enabled; vendor preset: enabled)
   Active: failed (Result: exit-code) since Sun 2019-12-29 07:20:23 GMT; 7min ago
     Docs: man:memcached(1)
  Process: 19857 ExecStart=/usr/share/memcached/scripts/systemd-memcached-wrapper /etc/memcached.conf (code=exited, status=64)
 Main PID: 19857 (code=exited, status=64)

Dec 29 07:20:23 mail.example.com systemd[1]: memcached.service: Service hold-off time over, scheduling restart.
Dec 29 07:20:23 mail.example.com systemd[1]: memcached.service: Scheduled restart job, restart counter is at 5.
Dec 29 07:20:23 mail.example.com systemd[1]: Stopped memcached daemon.
Dec 29 07:20:23 mail.example.com systemd[1]: memcached.service: Start request repeated too quickly.
Dec 29 07:20:23 mail.example.com systemd[1]: memcached.service: Failed with result 'exit-code'.
Dec 29 07:20:23 mail.example.com systemd[1]: Failed to start memcached daemon.

 

 

When failing to start, the status messages don’t really give any clues as to why, but looking at /var/log/syslog specifically for the Failed to start memcached daemon message gives a clue: can't run as root without the -u switch

Dummy Content
sudo grep -B 8 'Failed to start memcached daemon' /var/log/syslog
Dec 29 07:20:22 mail systemd-memcached-wrapper[19857]: can't run as root without the -u switch
Dec 29 07:20:22 mail systemd[1]: memcached.service: Main process exited, code=exited, status=64/n/a
Dec 29 07:20:22 mail systemd[1]: memcached.service: Failed with result 'exit-code'.
Dec 29 07:20:23 mail systemd[1]: memcached.service: Service hold-off time over, scheduling restart.
Dec 29 07:20:23 mail systemd[1]: memcached.service: Scheduled restart job, restart counter is at 5.
Dec 29 07:20:23 mail systemd[1]: Stopped memcached daemon.
Dec 29 07:20:23 mail systemd[1]: memcached.service: Start request repeated too quickly.
Dec 29 07:20:23 mail systemd[1]: memcached.service: Failed with result 'exit-code'.
Dec 29 07:20:23 mail systemd[1]: Failed to start memcached daemon.

 

 

To start the Memcached server – not as root, but as user memcache – add the following line to the file /etc/memcached.conf:

-u memcache
-l 127.0.0.1

 

 

Start the Memcached server:

Dummy Content
sudo systemctl start memcached

 

 

About the author

A native Brit exiled in Japan, Steve spends too much of his time struggling with the Japanese language, dreaming of fish & chips and writing the occasional blog post he hopes others will find helpful.

Add comment

Steve

Recent Comments

Recent Posts